Kindertransport

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The Kindertransport (German for children transport) is a rescue mission that took place during the nine months prior to the outbreak of the Second World War. The United Kingdom took in nearly 10,000 predominantly Jewish children from Nazi Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland, and the Free City of Danzig. The children were placed in British foster homes, hostels, schools and farms. Often they were the only members of their families who survived the Holocaust.

The Kindertransport (German for children transport) is a rescue mission that took place during the nine months prior to the outbreak of the Second World War. The United Kingdom took in nearly 10,000 predominantly Jewish children from Nazi Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland, and the Free City of Danzig. The children were placed in British foster homes, hostels, schools and farms. Often they were the only members of their families who survived the Holocaust. Most of the children arrived in the United Kingdom via Harwich in Essex where they were accommodated at the Warners Holiday Camp prior to moving on to their foster familiies. There is a memorial sign on  the sea wall at Harwich and also a memorial with statues at Liverpool Street Staion in London (many of the children passed through this station).

Unveiling memorial to the Kindertransport at Harwich

Memorial sign at Harwich to the Kindertransport

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