Royal Observer Corps Post, Great Horkesley

Back Boxted Church Road, Great Horkesley

On the south side of Boxted Church Road, where high ground commands wide views in every direction, is a finely-surviving World War Two Royal Observer Corps post. The structure, appearing above heavy undergrowth at ground level, is of a brick-built rectangular building with one half open-topped and the other with a flat concrete roof. The outside measurements are 14’ 9” (4.5 m) x 8’ 3” (2.5 m). The height is approximately 7 feet (2.1 m) above the rough ground.

On the south side of Boxted Church Road, where high ground commands wide views in every direction, is a finely-surviving World War Two Royal Observer Corps post. The structure, appearing above heavy undergrowth at ground level, is of a brick-built rectangular building with one half open-topped and the other with a flat concrete roof. The outside measurements are 14’ 9” (4.5 m) x 8’ 3” (2.5 m). The height is approximately 7 feet (2.1 m) above the rough ground.

The interior is approached via a short flight of concrete steps, through an open entrance. Here, there is an open-topped chamber measuring 8’ 7” (2.6  m) x 6’ 9” (2.1 m) . The dominant feature is the central steel post, 4’ 3” (1.3 m) high, which has an instrument mounting plate on the top.  On the wall in the enclosure, in the southwest corner, the letters “SW” are painted in white. In the NW corner is an entrance doorway (but no door) to a roofed-over chamber. This is at a lower level than the observation enclosure. This is a small room measuring 4’ 5” (1.4 m) x 6’ (1.8 m). In the west wall, low down, is an open escape hatch which, during wartime, would probably have been sealed with loosely laid bricks. In the N wall there is a small observation opening. Between the two chambers is a small window which has no glass but has retained its wooden frame.

Around the top of the open enclosure wooden framing has been attached. Onto this a steel framework and corrugated iron sheeting remain. This is probably a post-war addition to enable the structure to be re-used, perhaps for storage.

Aerial photographs from May 1946, April 1949 and August 1950, at NMR, Swindon, show the structure standing open-topped looking much as it does now. In these photographs something is apparent alongside the ROC post, on its W side. This may have been a small overgrown hut.

External view

External view

Internal view showing post for mounting an instrument

Internal view showing post for mounting an instrument

View of escape hatch

View of escape hatch

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